Winter weeks 3 & 4; November13, 2014

Whats in the box(es)? 

winterbox3-4potatoes

beets

onions

garlic

cabbage

spinach

diakon radish

green top and topped turnips

leeks

carrots

brussel sprouts

collard greens

winter squash

Notes on the box(es)…. 

We tried to harvest some broccoli and kale for you, but it was too frozen.  Kale was crumbling apart and broccoli was frozen solid and thawed into a sad floppy tree.  But the Collards and brussel sprouts did okay during harvest and everything else was gotten before the big cold snap rolled in. 

To store brussel sprouts, snap them off the stalk into a plastic storage bag, seal, and keep in your fridge. 

Cabbage will keep for a looooooong time in your fridge.  Cabbage always keeps for a long time, but adding that this is a storage variety, it can hang out for quite some time.  You may have to remove the outer leaves, but it will still be good.  If you’ve ever considered making sauerkraut or kimchi, this is a good time!  Did you know that 2 tablespoons of fermented vegetables have as many probiotics as an entire bottle of probiotic supplements?!  And much of our immune system is dependent on healthy gut flora.  So during cold and flu season, it’s very important to get some fermented veggies in our systems.  We love a serving of kimchi with a fried egg for breakfast.  Making fermented veggies is a great way to save a lot of money and help your gut flora. And it will make your veggies keep well into the spring while saving space in your fridge!  And all you really need are your veggies and some salt! Give it a try!

 Recipes… 

Mama Rama's Farmer Style Kimchi
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Ingredients
1 head of cabbage, sliced very thin with a knife or mandolin, or shredded
3 medium leeks, sliced thin
2 cups of carrots, grated or processed into small bits but not pureed
1 diakon radish, sliced very thin or shredded
1-2 tablespoons of grated fresh ginger
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced
1/2-2 tsp. dried chile flakes (depending on your taste for spice)
1 tablespoon sea salt
4 tablespoons of whey (if not available, add an additional tablespoon of salt) *note on whey - if you have plain yogurt in your fridge, the liquid that comes to the top is the whey that we use for our ferments. If you are dairy free, you can use some liquid from other fermented vegetables such as the ones from Angelica's Garden that you can buy in the co-ops.
Instructions
The quick way that I get the veggies ready is with our food processor. I roughly chop the carrots, some peeled ginger, and the garlic and pulse them with the blade until they are all in small pieces, but not pureed. Then I switch to my shredding blade and put the cabbage, leeks, and radish through emptying ingredients frequently into a large bowl or pot. Sprinkle the salt over the veggies and add the whey (or the additional salt) mix everything up with your hands (wait to add the chile flakes until the very end so that you don't get hot hands!). Squeeze, massage, and smash veggies to encourage them to release juices. Let them sit for a few minutes while you clean things up, then come back and mix and smash them some more. Now mix in the chile flakes and start putting the veggies into wide mouth quart jars (this recipe should fill at least 2). Really pack them in tightly using your fist to pound the veggies down (if your fist fits in the jar, if not, use a wooden mallet or wooden spoon) You want the veggies to be submerged under the liquid that the veggies released. If you cant get veggies totally submerged, you can put part of a cabbage leaf on top then press down to keep the little bit of veggies under the liquid. Leave an inch of headspace. Put a lid on the jar, but don't screw it down too tightly as gasses will need to escape. Put the jars into a glass baking dish and set on your counter (the kimchi will start to bubble and will likely overflow some juice while it sits). Let it sit for 3-7 days depending on the temperature of your house. Bubbles will start coming up on the second or third day. Allow to sit for one to two days after bubbles get going. Lid tightly, rinse jar, and store in your fridge. Use as you would a condiment. Serve with beans, eggs, noodles, rice, etc. Cooking kimchi will destroy the good bacteria, so don't heat it!
Turnip Rock CSA http://turniprock.com/blog/
Sauerkraut

Orecchiette with Butternut Squash and Sage

Wild Rice and Butternut Squash Salad with Maple Balsamic Dressing

Orange Glazed Brussel Sprouts and Butternut

Cabbage and Radish Slaw with Peanut Dressing to be served at room temperature

Vegan Lentil Shepherd’s Pie

One pot Cabbage Casserole

Dijon Roasted Cabbage is a healthy one

and this is Roasted Cabbage recipe with bacon in it. 

On the farm…

     Looking at the 10 day forecast, it seems as though we won’t make it above freezing, and will be 20 degrees below average!  We are not equipped to handle the extreme cold in our pack shed.  Also, the greens and broccoli are too frozen to harvest, so what is out of the field is everything that we have to offer!  In an effort to save yourselves and your farmers a trip to your drop site, we have combined the last two deliveries.  So here are the last TWO boxes of vegetables.  A lot of the items don’t need to be stored in your fridge, so we hope to not overflow your fridge. 

     So this wraps up the Winter Shares!  We think you will still have local veggies around for your Thanksgiving meal.  Yay!  We are grateful for our CSA members!  Thank you! 

Best way to bring a baby out to the field on a snowy day.

Best way to bring a baby out to the field on a snowy day.

It's hard to make bunches with gloves on, but also hard with cold wet fingers!

It’s hard to make bunches with gloves on, but also hard with cold wet fingers!

Harvesting in the snow!

Harvesting in the snow!

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Taste testing the snow!

Taste testing the snow!

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Okay! Ready to go back inside!

Happy Winter, everyone!

Winter Share week 2; November 6, 2014

What’s in the box?  

20141106_134607Thanks to Chris and Cheyenne for the photo and the recipe this week!

Broccoli

Vitamin Green

Spinach

Potatoes

Beets

Carrots

Onions

Leeks

Brussel Sprouts

Winter Squash assortment

Salad Turnips

Dino Kale 

Recipes…  

Palak Paneer from members Chris and Cheyenne
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Ingredients
Palak Paneer (Saag Paneer)
For the palak puree
• 1 large bunch fresh spinach (I used 1 and 1/2 bags from the CSA)
• 1 to 3 green chiles, chopped (I use serrano)
• 4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped (optional)
• 1/2 inch ginger, peeled, roughly chopped
For the palak curry
• 1 medium yellow onion onion, chopped
• 1 medium sized tomato, chopped
• 4-5 garlic cloves, finely chopped
• 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
• 1 tsp cumin powder
• 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
• 1/2 to 3/4 tsp red chili powder (optional)
• 1 and 1/2 tsp garam masala powder
• 2 bay leaves
• 10 oz paneer or tofu, cubed
• 1/2 cup heavy cream
• 2 Tbsp oil (or ghee or unsalted butter)
• salt to taste
• water as needed
Making the spinach puree
1. Rinse the spinach very well
2. Bring water to a boil
3. Turn off heat, and add the spinach leaves to the hot water.
4. Cover and let the spinach leaves sit in the water for 2-3 mins.
5. Drain and immediately add the spinach to a bowl containing ice cold water
6. This method helps to preserve the green color of the spinach.
7. Drain and then puree the spinach in a blender or hand held blender with ginger, garlic, and green chiles
8. Blend until just smooth
Making the palak curry
1. Heat oil or ghee in a pan
2. Fry the cumin seeds in hot oil until they become fragrant
3. Add the bay leaves and onions
4. Add paneer or tofu cubes, saute briefly until lightly browned, turning often, remove cubes and set aside
5. Saute until the onions become browned
6. Add the garlic and tomatoes
7. Add the turmeric powder, red chili powder, and cumin
8. Add the spinach puree
9. Simmer on low 6-10 minutes until spinach is cooked through
10. Add paneer or tofu cubes
11. Simmer until paneer cubes become soft, about 3-5 minutes
12. Add cream and stir, simmer 2-3 minutes
13. Serve the palak paneer hot with naan or basmati rice
Turnip Rock CSA http://turniprock.com/blog/
Spiced Squash Cheesecake Bars
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Ingredients
1 pack graham crackers crushed into fine crumbs and mixed with 1/2 cup nuts processed into flour-like texture
1 stick butter, melted
1- 2 cups roasted or steamed squash flesh, pureed and spiced with your favorite combination of warming spices (I used 1 tsp. cinnamon, 1 tsp. ginger, 1/2 tsp allspice, 1/4 tsp cloves) and sweetened to taste with sugar (I used about 3 Tbsp. sugar)
4 eggs
8 oz cream cheese
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup whole milk or cream
3 Tbsp. flour
1/2-3/4 cup sugar (to your taste)
pinch of salt
Instructions
Heat oven to 325 degrees. Melt butter and mix with graham crackers and nuts. Press mixture into the bottom of a 9 x 13 inch rectangle pan. Place in fridge until ready to use.
Puree eggs, cream cheese, sour cream, milk or cream, flour, and sugar with spiced Winter Squash. Pour mixture onto crust and bake for 25-35 min or until middle is loosely set. Cool before serving.
Turnip Rock CSA http://turniprock.com/blog/
Beet Caviar from 101 cookbooks 

Squash Toasts With Ricotta and Cider Vinegar from Smitten Kitchen

Spinach and Egg Pizzettes from Smitten Kitchen

Turkey Meatball Vegetable Soup (recipe calls for Arugula, but feel free to substitute Turnip Greens or Vitamin Greens)

 

 On the farm…

It’s officially getting cold.  And it was raining during harvest.  But we didn’t get any snow, yet!  We are scrambling to get things out of the fields before the ground freezes.  There’s just Josh and Dana working on the farm right now, and they are really working hard to get the boxes to you!  We were grateful to have the help of a visitor and aspiring farmer, Ashley, on Wednesday.  Many hands make work light, and in the cold rain, the extra hands are even more appreciated.  Thanks Ashley!  

We have been reading through the Summer Share Surveys and are so pleased with the feedback.  We were really happy to hear that almost everyone really enjoyed the Vitamin Green and the Pak Choi!  We got some lovely compliments and the complaints were few and far between and mainly had to do with CSA not fitting in with people’s lifestyle, which we understand.  We know that our most experienced home chefs and committed members sign up for Winter Shares, so we want to thank you for being that!  

We hope you are enjoying the sweetness of the greens and roots after they have been through some cold temperatures.  We will see what’s left in the field for greens after this cold weather is with us for a solid week.  Hopefully everything is still in good shape, but even tastier!  Sorry we don’t have pictures this week.  We’ve had some technical difficulties.  Please feel free to share any photos of you and meals you’ve made, if you like!  We love to include that on the blog!   

Extended Season Week 1; October 30, 2014

What’s in the box? 

IMG_0784potatoes

green top carrots

hakurei aka salad turnips

diakon radish

leeks

pak choi

broccoli

broccoli leaves (the greens in a bunch)

fennel fronds (the wispy bunched greens that smell anise like)

spinach

onions

brussel sprouts on the stalk

pie pumpkins

Notes on the box…

To store brussel sprouts, pop them off the stalk into a plastic bag and keep them in your fridge.  This is a fun task with kids.  Notice how they grow in a spiral on the stalk.  So cool!

We’ve recently got word that broccoli leaves are soon to be the new “it” vegetable.  The new brussel sprout since brussel sprouts took over kale.  So you guys will be like “Oh, I was eating broccoli leaves before they were cool.”  Prepare them as you would collards or kale.  They are chock full of vitamins and usually just go to waste in the field.  Let us know what you think! 

Fennel fronds are from some fennel that we planted too late and it wasn’t going to size up.  But, you can use these fronds as an herb. They have an anise or licorice type flavor.  They are great chopped and added to roast carrots and turnips, or used as a bed upon which to bake fish.  Instant fancy. 

See the blog a few weeks ago for several links to diakon radish recipes.

Recipes… 

Greens! with bacon, nuts, and raisins
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Ingredients
4 slices of thick bacon
1 small onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
a bunch of broccoli leaves, collards, or kale, stemmed and chopped
another bunch of greens - turnip greens, mustard greens, braising greens, or kale stemmed and chopped
1/3 cup raisins soaked in 1/3 cup boiling water
1/3 cup toasted sunflower seeds, pine nuts, or pumpkin seeds
Instructions
Soak raisins in boiling water.
Fry bacon in large skillet until crisp. Remove from bacon grease to drain. Cook onion in bacon grease over medium low heat until translucent. Add tougher greens (broccoli greens or collards) until wilted. Add raisins and their water (carefully so as not to get splashed with bacon grease) stir and cover quickly. Cook stirring once or twice until greens are tender (about 5 min). Add the other greens and stir. Cook until wilted (about 3 min). Stir in bacon and toasted nuts, salt and pepper to taste, and serve hot.
Turnip Rock CSA http://turniprock.com/blog/
Broccoli Cheese Soup

 Carrot Orange Fennel Soup (use fronds instead of bulb that the recipe calls for)

 

On the Farm

sprout spiral

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Queen Francie RIPIMG_0781

Hand sized spinach leaves  (gloves are to keep that cold dew off tender fingers)

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Caption contest:

 

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Week 18; October 23, 2014. Final delivery of the season!

What’s in the box? 

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Full Share

pak choi

carrots

broccoli

red onions

brussel sprouts

rainbow chard

parsley

winter squash

spinach

head lettuce

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Single Share

pak choi

head lettuce

winter squash

red onions

brussel sprouts

broccoli

parsley

carrots

Notes on the box…  

Brussel Sprouts are such a treat, but this season they matured a little late and unevenly.  We picked what was ready, but feel pretty disappointed that we weren’t able to get more to you.  Good news for Winter Share folks who are fans of Brussel Sprouts, though.  Some of them got extra large size.  Trim off the stalk part and then cut them in half before cooking.  They all taste great! 

We are giving a medley of Winter Squash today.  Everyone got some combination that included pie pumpkins, black futsu squash, autumn crown pumpkin, delicata, acorn, red kuri, or butternut. Black Futsu is an heirloom and a personal favorite.  The skins are edible, so it’s good for recipes where you remove the seeds then slice the squash into moons and roast the slices (see a few weeks ago when we had delicata squash). 

Pak Choi, again?  wow.  Three times was WAY more than we planned on giving this vegetable, but it loved the weather or something. It wouldn’t stop growing!  Hopefully you have learned to love it!  It is wonderful chopped and added to stir fry or soup. 

The chard can be used as you would spinach.  I like to stretch the amount of spinach that I have by adding card to it.  Spinach/Chard Lasagna?  Yum!  

Recipes…  

 Green Juice  The recipe calls for cucumbers, but we’ve been adding apples to our juice. 

Winter Panzanella from Smitten Kitchen  uses winter squash and brussel sprouts

Moroccan Spiced Carrot Hummus

Brussel Sprout Salad with Apples and Candied Walnuts

Twice Baked Squash with Quinoa, Pecans, and Parmesan  Recipe calls for Butternut, but any squash would work well. 

On the farm…

Usually at week 18 we are all feeling relief that the season is wrapping up.  It takes a ton of thought, planning, timing, sacrifice, luck, energy, and work from all of us to get these boxes out to you during the growing season.  Our next season starts as soon as the deliveries end.  We are cleaning up the farm and getting things ready for the snow to fall, reading surveys, packing and delivering season extension shares, going over what we want to change, working on our budget for the remainder of the season and for next season, we move on to crop planning, equipment maintenance and repair…  There are still animals that need care every day.  We have to look for crew members for next season.  And this Winter there will be off farm jobs, as well. 

So at the end of the season we are usually dreaming about shrinking our CSA to 20 members, turning the barn into a haunted house, and starting a kitchey pumpkin patch.  But this season, with the warmer weather and sunshine, the best fall colors we’ve seen in a long time, great feedback from members, and the boxes wrapping up in a way that we are overall pretty happy with; we feel like saving the pumpkin patch for a retirement dream and are already feeling optimistic and looking forward to next season.  

Overall we feel good about this past season.  We had fewer of some crops than we had planned (melons, cucumbers, and winter squash)  and some crops did really well (lettuce, broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower).  This is the nature of CSA farming, not everything goes according to crop plan. 

It’s tough to keep the big picture in mind at times as to why we are doing this.  But our passion is good food raised responsibly going to a group of people who are hoping to change the world one meal at a time. But we know that those ideals are also as important as the value you get in the box. So we are always trying to give you both the ideal you signed up for, a healthy balanced farm and the value of what you bought into.

 If you enjoyed being a member of Turnip Rock, we would LOVE for you to stick with us!  When members return from year to year we are able to focus more on growing healthy food which we love to do, and less on marketing (which is honestly not a place where we excel).  If you love CSA,  we really hope that you will tell your friends and family. Word of mouth is the best advertising we can get and we need to get more people excited and educated about the importance of local food so that all the small farms can thrive and we can shift how our food system works, making it more sustainable and healthy for ourselves and our environment. 

Next season we will FINALLY be offering a cheese share!  We will be sending you information about adding it to your 2015 CSA share as soon as we get the odds and ends of our cheese room finished.  This may involve a crowd-funding effort, so keep an eye out for that. 

We are so grateful to have grown food for you and your families this season.  Please fill out the survey that we email to you and let us know about your experience.  We can’t thank you enough for your support of a local, just, and responsible food system, and our little piece of the puzzle called Turnip Rock Farm ! 

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black futsu

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butternut

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pie pumpkin

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autumn crown (mini long island cheese)

IMG_1581 IMG_1567 IMG_1707 IMG_1710 IMG_1719 IMG_1731 IMG_1728 IMG_1736And a big huge overwhelming THANK YOU to the 2014 farm crew who made it all come together.  Haley and Dana were with us full time and Sam worked with us again part time.  These guys are amazingly self motivated, smart, funny, and fast! They brought a great positive attitude to work and cared about the farm and the boxes in a very generous way.  Dana is sticking around to help us with the Winter Shares and Haley is headed to the city to keep up her work with food employment.  Sam is going adventuring and will be working on farms in warmer climates.  We hope to have all of them back with us in the future.  Big hugs guys!  We couldn’t do it without you! 

Oh hey, Did we just get a shout out from the first lady?! 

Just kidding.  She doesn’t know us.  Anyway…

Lots of love from the 2014 crew at TurntUp Rock Farm! 

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Week 17; October 16, 2014

What’s in the box? 

 

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Full Share

butternut squash

savoy cabbage

leeks

braising mix (baby kale)

collards

pak choi

sage

daikon radish

potatoes

onions

IMG_1563

Single Share

potatoes

onions

butternut squash

pak choi

braising mix (baby kale)

leeks

sage

daikon radish

Notes on the box… 

 Everyone’s favorite, Butternut Squash!  The skins of these are not edible.  you can peel them with a sturdy vegetable peeler or with a knife.  Butternut is great for soups and sautees, and steaming and things.  It makes a fantastic “pumpkin” pie.  In fact, most of the canned pumpkin that you can buy in the store is actually made of butternut squash.  It should be kept on your counter. 

Daikon radish is great for kimchi if you’ve been considering some home fermentation, also great for quick pickles to add some crunch to sandwiches, and soups.  We also have some recipes for a few new things to try.  Daikon will keep for about forever in a plastic bag in your crisper.  Cut off what you need for a recipe and leave the rest for another time. 

Recipes… 

Haley's Butternut, Cabbage, and Sage Gallette
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Ingredients
3 cups cabbage quartered, cored and sliced ½-inch thick
3 cups butternut squash peeled, seeded, and sliced ½-inch thick
1 large onion or 3 small, halved and sliced ½-inch thick
2 tablespoons olive oil
5-10 fresh sage leaves (as you prefer), thinly sliced
Salt and ground black pepper
1 9-inch piecrust (refrigerated store bought or homemade - your choice)
4 ounces light cream cheese
1 cup Gruyere, Fontina, or other flavorful melting cheese, grated
Instructions
Place cabbage, butternut squash, and onions on a large rimmed baking sheet. Toss with olive oil sage, and a generous sprinkling of salt and pepper. Set vegetables on bottom rack in cold oven; set to 425 degrees and roast, stirring once, until just cooked and starting to color, 15 to 20 minutes.
Meanwhile, roll pie dough to a 14-inch circle and set on a large cookie sheet. Mix cream cheese and ¾ of the grated cheese of choice in a large bowl. Add hot vegetables to cheese mixture , toss to thoroughly mix. Adjust seasonings. Spread mixture over pastry, leaving a 2-inch border. Fold pastry border over vegetables and sprinkle with remaining grated cheese. Bake on middle rack until bubbly and golden brown, about 20 minutes. Cool for 5 minutes, slice, and serve.
Turnip Rock CSA http://turniprock.com/blog/
Stir Fried Ginger Pak Choi

Kimchi

Daikon Au Gratin

 Daikon and Pork Soup

Daikon Radish Soup

Bibimbop with Beef Golgogi

Cabbage and Radish Slaw with Peanut Dressing

White Bean and Pumpkin Hummus

Roasted Butternut Squash Salad with Chickpeas, Kale, and Pearl Couscous

 

On the Farm…

Second to last CSA box for the main season.  We still have some Winter Shares available, but you will need to email us if you’d like to add it.  We also have the 2015 early signup open and hope that you will jump on it!  A deposit is required at signup, but the next payment isn’t due until January.  And you can use your RETURNIP coupon for a discount.  Early signup ensures you get this seasons price.  Were you on the wait list for an egg share in 2014?  Early signups get you an egg share before they sell out!

Are you looking to take care of your Winter wellness?  Looking for natural immunity boosters before cold and flu season starts?  Try out a Red Clover Herbal Apothecary Winter CSA share. 

Looking to eat up local foods through the cold Winter?  We highly recommend the Winter Share of Foxtail Farm!  This will get you deliveries of storage crops, homemade breads, granola, soups, and frozen veggies for multiple deliveries from November into 2015.  Deliveries are once every three weeks.  Please have a look and consider this option!  Foxtail Winter Share is a great value!  Contact Foxtail Farm for their 2014 sign up information. 

Next week we will put out the member survey. We hope you have enjoyed the season and look forward to being your farmers for as long as you’ll have us! 

This week on the farm….

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some more frost happened

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And some beautiful morningsIMG_1541

and some garlic planting!

IMG_1543and some more dirt eating happened

some more dirt eating happened

each clove of garlic was planted into well fertilized soil by hand with love so that we may offer up big beautiful heads of garlic into your boxes next season!  We planted all that wasn’t sold as the “garlic add on” plus a little over 100 pounds of seed that we purchased.  Garlic for all next season! 

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We all got in on planting.  Even our sweet kitty Whitman came out to the field to help out.  IMG_1548

Otto spread some milkweed seed in hopes of good butterfly habitat for next season.IMG_1550

The pak choi stood up and said “Hello!”

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The cabbage patch offered up some heads that were too big for CSA boxesIMG_1552

The daikon radish jumped up out of the soil and said “Pick me!  Pick me!”IMG_1530 IMG_1553

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The colors continued to get even more beautiful!  We had no idea that was even possible.

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And we had some fun times, as usual.  And quality control stayed on top of the job.  IMG_1559 IMG_1544 And after two wonderful seasons, our jewel of an employee, Miranda hit the road for new adventures.  Her hard work and nurturing spirit and genuine care made a lasting impression on the farm and our hearts.  We feel lucky to have had her in our community and we feel lucky to count her as a great friend.  Bon Voyage, Mud Pie!  Come on back anytime!

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